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Message posted on 03/01/2020

EASA 2020 CfP - Panel 164 "Intimacy in the Time of Globalization: Anthropology Exploring the Intersection of Love, Sexuality and Mobility"

Dear colleagues,

we are happy to share a call for papers for our panel "Intimacy in the Time of Globalization: Anthropology Exploring the Intersection of Love, Sexuality and Mobility" at the EASA conference 2020 in Lisbon. For those who are interested in submitting a paper, please use the "Propose paper" button on the EASA website . The deadline is 20th of January 2020 and each proposal must contain:

  • a paper title
  • the name/s and email address/es of author/s
  • a short abstract of fewer than 300 characters
  • a long abstract of fewer than 250 words

Attention! Applicants must not necessarily be EASA members in order to submit a proposal.

Please forward to anyone you think might be interested.

"Intimacy in the Time of Globalization: Anthropology Exploring the Intersection of Love, Sexuality and Mobility"

Short abstract: This panel looks at the way mobility and intimacy (shorthand for love, sexuality and everything in-between) shape one another. Global forces, as well as gender, ethnicity, class or age also come into play in this new anthropological approach generating a growing scholarship across and beyond Europe.

Long abstract: People on the move do not stop being people who fall in love or feel desire, even in the direst of situations. On the contrary, distance might stimulate or exacerbate these feelings and behaviours, while cultural and social contexts may reconfigure ideas about gender roles and identities, love and sexuality. Intimacy, as shorthand for love, sexuality and everything in-between, is not only an important aspect of migrants' lives, but its very nature is shaped by mobility and other global forces, as well as notions of gender, ethnicity, nationality, class, age or the life course. And if we consider LGBTQ* people moving out of their home countries in search for more inclusive and safer environments, as well as the ubiquity of transnational and cross-cultural relationships, marriage migration, sex tourism or the mobility of sex workers across borders, just to name a few examples, we see that oftentimes intimacy can also be a catalyst for mobility. Although the study of migration has a long history in our field, the anthropologies of love and sexuality are comparably much younger areas of inquiry. Following the idea of "New Horizons of Interdisciplinarity," this panel focuses on the intersection of these two anthropological traditions, an articulation which is becoming increasingly recognized in scholarly work across and beyond Europe. Our aim is to underline the tremendous importance of intimacy in the lives of people on the move and to encourage research into the ways in which intimacy and mobility shape one another.

Best Regards,

Dumitrita Lunca (Hamburg University) Christian Groes (Roskilde University)

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