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Letter from our Book Series Editor

Evva Berglund
Eeva Berglund

The EASA series published by Berghahn Books consists of monographs and edited volumes by members of the Association. Our books can be concerned with any part of the world and deal with any worthwhile issue of anthropological concern. Whether you are just beginning to think about publishing your work, or have already started to compile a book proposal, I would be happy to hear from you. There is information about about the series and how to prepare a book proposal at www.easaonline.org/bookseri.shtml but I’m happy to answer queries, at any stage of the process, via email,

I will also be taking part in EASA’s Biennial Conference in Tallinn in the summer. I will be participating in panels and contributing to the Saturday lunchtime ‘meet the editors’ session, so do please come and talk to me there too. To support me in producing a series that really serves the discipline and the Association, and quite specifically for finding the best possible people to review both proposals and manuscripts, I have gathered together a small group of Association members to act as an editorial board. I really look forward to working with them and thank them for taking up the invitation.

Knut Nustad, Oslo Sian Lazar, Cambridge Susana Narotzky, Barcelona Michal Buchowski, Poznan Manos Spyridakis, Peloponnese Birgit Muller, LAIOS, Paris

A list of acknowledgements of the many other people whose work has helped produced the series so far will be published later, the series is fundamentally indebted to them.

Eeva Berglund Book series editor

Recently published
Florian Mühlfried Being a State and States of Being in Highland Georgia May 2014 - see next item

Forthcoming
Kathryn Rountree (ed.) Contemporary Pagan and Native Faith Movements in Europe
Jens Kjaerulff (ed.) Flexible Capitalism: Exchange and Ambiguity at Work